List of Explosive Materials per ATF Federal Law & Storage

Department of Justice: Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives:

2017 Annual List of Explosive Materials

 

Source: Federal Register, Vol. 82 No. 248 December 28, 2017 https://www.gpo.gov

 

In accordance with Federal law, the Department of Justice must publish and revise at least annually in the Federal Register a list of explosives determined to be explosive materials.

This list covers explosives, blasting agents and detonators, all of which are defined as “explosive materials.” Each material listed, as well as all mixtures containing any of these materials, constitute ‘‘explosive materials’’ under 18 U.S.C. 841(c). This list contains the 2017 Annual List of Explosive Materials, which remains unchanged from the 2016 Annual List of Explosives.

Note: While the list is comprehensive, it is not all-inclusive. The fact that an explosive material is not on this list doesn’t mean that it is not within the coverage of the law if it otherwise meets the statutory definition in 18 U.S.C. 841.

Materials constituting blasting agents are marked in italics.

Explosive materials are listed alphabetically and followed by their common names (where applicable), chemical names, and/or synonyms in brackets.

 

A

Acetylides of heavy metals.

Aluminum containing polymeric propellant.

Aluminum ophorite explosive.

Amatex.

Amatol.

Ammonal.

Ammonium nitrate explosive mixtures (cap sensitive).

Ammonium nitrate explosive mixtures (non-cap sensitive).

Ammonium perchlorate having particle size less than 15 microns.

Ammonium perchlorate explosive mixtures (excluding ammonium perchlorate composite propellant (APCP)).

Ammonium picrate [picrate of ammonia, Explosive D].

Ammonium salt lattice with isomorphously substituted inorganic salts.

NFO [ammonium nitrate-fuel oil]. Aromatic nitro-compound explosive mixtures.

Azide explosives.

B

Baranol.

Baratol.

BEAF [1, 2-bis (2, 2-difluoro-2- nitroacetoxyethane)].

Black powder.

Black powder based explosive mixtures.

Black powder substitutes.

Blasting agents, nitro-carbo-nitrates, including non-cap sensitive slurry and water gel explosives.

Blasting caps.

Blasting gelatin.

Blasting powder.

BTNEC [bis (trinitroethyl) carbonate].

BTNEN [bis (trinitroethyl) nitramine].

BTTN [1,2,4 butanetriol trinitrate].

Bulk salutes.

Butyl tetryl.

 

C

Calcium nitrate explosive mixture.

Cellulose hexanitrate explosive mixture.

Chlorate explosive mixtures.

Composition A and variations.

Composition B and variations.

Composition C and variations.

Copper acetylide.

Cyanuric triazide.

Cyclonite [RDX].

Cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine [HMX].

Cyclotol.

Cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine [RDX].

 

D

DATB [diaminotrinitrobenzene].

DDNP [diazodinitrophenol].

DEGDN [diethyleneglycol dinitrate].

Detonating cord.

Detonators.

Dimethylol dimethyl methane dinitrate composition.

Dinitroethyleneurea.

Dinitroglycerine [glycerol dinitrate].

Dinitrophenol.

Dinitrophenolates.

Dinitrophenyl hydrazine.

Dinitroresorcinol.

Dinitrotoluene-sodium nitrate explosive mixtures.

DIPAM [dipicramide; diaminohexanitrobiphenyl].

Dipicryl sulfone.

Dipicrylamine.

Display fireworks.

DNPA [2,2-dinitropropyl acrylate].

DNPD [dinitropentano nitrile].

Dynamite.

 

E

 

EDDN [ethylene diamine dinitrate].

EDNA [ethylenedinitramine].

Ednatol.

EDNP [ethyl 4,4-dinitropentanoate].

EGDN [ethylene glycol dinitrate].

Erythritol tetranitrate explosives.

Esters of nitro-substituted alcohols.

Ethyl-tetryl.

Explosive conitrates.

Explosive gelatins.

Explosive liquids.

Explosive mixtures containing oxygen-releasing inorganic salts and hydrocarbons.

Explosive mixtures containing oxygen-releasing inorganic salts and nitro bodies.

Explosive mixtures containing oxygen-releasing inorganic salts and water insoluble fuels.

Explosive mixtures containing oxygen-releasing inorganic salts and water soluble fuels.

Explosive mixtures containing sensitized nitromethane.

Explosive mixtures containing tetranitromethane (nitroform).

Explosive nitro compounds of aromatic hydrocarbons.

Explosive organic nitrate mixtures.

Explosive powders.

 

F

 

Flash powder.

Fulminate of mercury.

Fulminate of silver.

Fulminating gold.

Fulminating mercury.

Fulminating platinum.

Fulminating silver.

 

G

 

Gelatinized nitrocellulose.

Gem-dinitro aliphatic explosive mixtures.

Guanyl nitrosamino guanyl tetrazene.

Guanyl nitrosamino guanylidene hydrazine.

Guncotton.

 

H

 

Heavy metal azides.

Hexanite.

Hexanitrodiphenylamine.

Hexanitrostilbene.

Hexogen [RDX].

Hexogene or octogene and a nitrated Nmethylaniline.

Hexolites.

HMTD [hexamethylenetriperoxidediamine].

HMX [cyclo-1,3,5,7-tetramethylene 2,4,6,8- tetranitramine; Octogen].

Hydrazinium nitrate/hydrazine/aluminum explosive system.

Hydrazoic acid.

 

I

 

Igniter cord.

Igniters.

Initiating tube systems.

 

K

 

KDNBF [potassium dinitrobenzo-furoxane].

 

L

 

Lead azide.

Lead mannite.

Lead mononitroresorcinate.

Lead picrate.

Lead salts, explosive.

Lead styphnate [styphnate of lead, lead trinitroresorcinate].

Liquid nitrated polyol and trimethylolethane.

Liquid oxygen explosives.

 

M

 

Magnesium ophorite explosives.

Mannitol hexanitrate.

MDNP [methyl 4,4-dinitropentanoate].

MEAN [monoethanolamine nitrate].

Mercuric fulminate.

Mercury oxalate.

Mercury tartrate.

Metriol trinitrate.

Minol-2 [40% TNT, 40% ammonium nitrate, 20% aluminum].

MMAN [monomethylamine nitrate]; methylamine nitrate.

Mononitrotoluene-nitroglycerin mixture.

Monopropellants.

 

N

 

NIBTN [nitroisobutametriol trinitrate].

Nitrate explosive mixtures.

Nitrate sensitized with gelled nitroparaffin.

Nitrated carbohydrate explosive.

Nitrated glucoside explosive.

Nitrated polyhydric alcohol explosives.

Nitric acid and a nitro aromatic compound explosive.

Nitric acid and carboxylic fuel explosive.

Nitric acid explosive mixtures.

Nitro aromatic explosive mixtures.

Nitro compounds of furane explosive mixtures.

Nitrocellulose explosive.

Nitroderivative of urea explosive mixture.

Nitrogelatin explosive.

Nitrogen trichloride.

Nitrogen tri-iodide.

Nitroglycerine [NG, RNG, nitro, glyceryl trinitrate, trinitroglycerine].

Nitroglycide.

Nitroglycol [ethylene glycol dinitrate, EGDN].

Nitroguanidine explosives.

Nitronium perchlorate propellant mixtures.

Nitroparaffins Explosive Grade and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

Nitrostarch.

Nitro-substituted carboxylic acids.

Nitrourea.

 

O

 

Octogen [HMX].

Octol [75 percent HMX, 25 percent TNT].

Organic amine nitrates.

Organic nitramines.

 

P

 

PBX [plastic bonded explosives].

Pellet powder.

Penthrinite composition.

Pentolite.

Perchlorate explosive mixtures.

Peroxide based explosive mixtures.

PETN [nitropentaerythrite, pentaerythrite tetranitrate, pentaerythritol tetranitrate].

Picramic acid and its salts.

Picramide.

Picrate explosives.

Picrate of potassium explosive mixtures.

Picratol.

Picric acid (manufactured as an explosive).

Picryl chloride.

Picryl fluoride.

PLX [95% nitromethane, 5% ethylenediamine].

Polynitro aliphatic compounds.

Polyolpolynitrate-nitrocellulose explosive gels.

Potassium chlorate and lead sulfocyanate explosive.

Potassium nitrate explosive mixtures.

Potassium nitroaminotetrazole.

Pyrotechnic compositions.

Pyrotechnic fuses.

PYX [2,6-bis(picrylamino)] 3,5- dinitropyridine.

 

R

 

RDX [cyclonite, hexogen, T4, cyclo-1,3,5,- trimethylene-2,4,6,-trinitramine; hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-S-triazine].

 

 

S

 

Safety fuse.

Salts of organic amino sulfonic acid explosive mixture.

Salutes (bulk).

Silver acetylide.

Silver azide.

Silver fulminate.

Silver oxalate explosive mixtures.

Silver styphnate.

Silver tartrate explosive mixtures.

Silver tetrazene.

Slurried explosive mixtures of water, inorganic oxidizing salt, gelling agent, fuel, and sensitizer (cap sensitive).

Smokeless powder.

Sodatol.

Sodium amatol.

Sodium azide explosive mixture.

Sodium dinitro-ortho-cresolate.

Sodium nitrate explosive mixtures.

Sodium nitrate-potassium nitrate explosive mixture.

Sodium picramate.

Squibs.

Styphnic acid explosives.

 

T

 

Tacot [tetranitro-2,3,5,6-dibenzo-1,3a,4,6a tetrazapentalene].

TATB [triaminotrinitrobenzene].

TATP [triacetonetriperoxide].

TEGDN [triethylene glycol dinitrate].

Tetranitrocarbazole.

Tetrazene [tetracene, tetrazine, 1(5- tetrazolyl)-4-guanyl tetrazene hydrate].

Tetrazole explosives.

Tetryl [2,4,6 tetranitro-N-methylaniline].

Tetrytol.

Thickened inorganic oxidizer salt slurried explosive mixture.

TMETN [trimethylolethane trinitrate].

TNEF [trinitroethyl formal].

TNEOC [trinitroethylorthocarbonate].

TNEOF [trinitroethylorthoformate].

TNT [trinitrotoluene, trotyl, trilite, triton].

Torpex.

Tridite.

Trimethylol ethyl methane trinitrate composition.

Trimethylolthane trinitrate-nitrocellulose.

Trimonite.

Trinitroanisole.

Trinitrobenzene.

Trinitrobenzoic acid.

Trinitrocresol.

Trinitro-meta-cresol.

Trinitronaphthalene.

Trinitrophenetol.

Trinitrophloroglucinol.

Trinitroresorcinol.

Tritonal.

 

U

Urea nitrate.

W

Water-bearing explosives having salts of oxidizing acids and nitrogen bases, sulfates, or sulfamates (cap sensitive).

Water-in-oil emulsion explosive compositions.

X

Xanthomonas hydrophilic colloid explosive mixture.

Type 1 Storage Requirements & Specifications for Approved Storage Regulations

Type-1 Storage Requirements

Type 1 Storage Magazines for approved storage. Get prices and pricing for budgetary purposes from KL Security

High explosives (including blasting caps, detonating cord, dynamite, shaped charges, boosters, etc.) must be stored in ​Type-1​ permanent magazines. Blasting agents stored ​with high explosives must be stored in ​Type-1​ or Type-2 magazine. Low explosives must be stored in Type-1​, -2, or -4 magazines.

Type-1​ permanent magazines must be:

  • Bullet-resistant
  • Fire-resistant
  • Weather-resistant
  • Theft-resistant
  • Inspected at least once ​every 7 days

Type-1 Storage Specifications

  • Locations of Outdoor Magazines
    • No closer to inhabited buildings, passenger railways, public highways, or other magazines than minimum distances specified in Tables of Distances

(https://www.atf.gov/explosives/table-distances)

  • Locations of Indoor Magazines
    • May not be located in a residence or dwelling
  • Vehicular Magazines (used only for low explosive storage)
    • Immobilize by removing wheels or installing a kingpin locking device when unattended

 

Type-1 Housekeeping and Construction

  • Hinges and hasps must be installed so that they cannot be removed when doors are closed and locked. They must be attached to doors by:
    • Welding, Riveting, or Bolting (nuts inside door)
  • Locks must be protected by ¼″ steel hoods to prevent theft. This doesn’t apply to doors secured on inside via bolt, lock, or bar that cannot be actuated from the outside. Each door must have:
    • 2 mortise locks

○  2 padlocks fastened in separate hasps & staples

■    Padlocks must have at least 5 tumblers and casehardened shackles (at least a 3/8″ diameter)

○           A combination of mortise lock and padlock

○      A mortise lock requiring 2 keys; or a 3-point lock

  • Lighting must meet National Electrical Code and/or NFPA 70-81 standards
    • Electrical switches and wiring must be located outside of the magazine

■   Battery-activated safety lights or lanterns are acceptable

  • Ground must slope away for drainage or provide other acceptable means for drainage
  • Magazines must be clean, dry, and free of grit, paper, empty packages/containers and trash
  • Spark-producing utensils cannot be stored in magazine
  • Explosive leakage stains must be cleaned
  • Deteriorated explosives must be destroyed per manufacturer instructions
  • The surrounding area must be kept clear of trash, brush, dry grass, or trees (less than 10′ tall), for no less than 25′ radius
  • Volatile materials must be kept at least 50′ away from outdoor magazines ● Live foliage to stabilize an earthen covering is acceptable

 

 

Item Requirements
Foundation Brick, concrete, cement block, stone, or wood posts. If piers or posts are used in lieu of continuous foundation, the space under buildings must be enclosed with metal.
Floors

 

 

Strong enough to bear maximum storage weight and non-sparking (pallets constructed of, or covered with, non-sparking material is acceptable).

 

Masonry Wall Brick, concrete, tile, cement block, or cinder block no less than 6” thick. Hollow masonry spaces filled with well-tamped, coarse, dry sand or weak concrete (1 part cement to 8 parts sand with water to dampen while tamping).
Metal Wall Fabricated sectional sheet steel or aluminum (no less than 14-gauge) securely fastened to metal framework. Interior walls lined with brick, solid cement blocks, hardwood (no less than 4” thick) or at least 6” sand fill between interior and exterior walls.
Interior Walls (Masonry and metal walls) Constructed of, or covered with, non-sparking material. Ferrous metal nails in floor and walls must be blind nailed, countersunk, or covered  with non-sparking material.
Wood Wall Exterior walls must be covered with iron or aluminum no less than 26-gauge. Inner walls must be covered with non-sparking material constructed to provide at least 6″ space between outer and inner walls. Space filled with coarse dry sand or weak concrete.
Ventilation (no openings except for entrances and ventilation)

 

 

Ventilation must be provided to prevent dampness and heating of explosives. Vent openings must be screened. Openings in side walls and foundations must be offset or shielded for bullet-resistance. Magazines with foundation and roof ventilators with air circulating between side walls and floors, or

 

side walls and ceiling must have a wooden lattice lining (or equivalent) to prevent stacking explosives against walls.
Roof (bullet-resistant ceiling /roof) For buildings without fabricated metal roofs, outer roof must be covered with no less than 26-guage iron or aluminum, fastened to at least 7/8″ sheathing.

 

If a bullet could be fired directly through the roof into magazine at an angle to strike explosives, the roof must:

●      Include a sand tray lined with a layer of nonporous material, filled with at least 4″ coarse, dry sand—located at tops of inner walls covering entire ceiling area (except ventilation); or

●      Be a fabricated metal roof of 3/16″ plate steel lined with 4″ hardwood. (For each additional 1/6″ plate steel, hardwood lining may be decreased by

1″.)

●      For roofs not of fabricated metal, outer roof must be covered with no less than 26-guage iron or aluminum, fastened to at least 7/8″ sheathing.

Doors Must be constructed of at least ¼″ plate steel and lined with at least 2″ hardwood
Igloo, “Army-type structure”, tunnel, and dugout Must be built of reinforced concrete, metal, masonry, or combination. If not bullet- resistant, must have earth mound covering of
at least 24” on top, sides and rear. Interior walls and floors must be constructed of, or covered with, non-sparking material.

Sources: ATF Publication 5400.17 (May 2016) and atf.gov.

© 2018 K.L. Security.

ATF Federal Explosives Storage Magazine Requirements

ATF Federal Explosives regulations noted in 27 CFR Part 555 Subpart K specify detailed construction requirements for explosive magazines. All explosive material MUST be kept in locked magazines UNLESS:

  • In the process of manufacture
  • Physically handled by a licensee or user during the operating process
  • Currently in use
  • In transport to a place of storage or use by a licensee, permittee, or an individual who lawfully and legally acquired explosive materials under Section 106 Subpart F

Explosive materials MUST be kept in magazines that meet the construction, locking, and specified table of distance requirements noted in Subpart K. When none of the specified conditions and standards listed above apply:

  • All explosive materials must be stored in appropriate magazines
  • Magazines must meet construction and housekeeping fulfillments noted in Sections

555.211 & 215

  • Magazines must meet table of distance requirements presented in Section 218
  • Magazines must be inspected every 7 days
  • Permanent outdoor magazines must have a solid foundation or be metal skirted to prevent access from underneath
  • Explosive materials may not be left unattended in Type-3 magazines (including “day boxes”) and must be removed to Type-1 or -2 magazines for storage
  • Storage regulations DO NOT apply to binary explosives until mixed

Explosive Types and Storage

High Explosives

High explosives is a function by detonation that causes a rapid decomposition of the material caused by a shock wave moving through the product at a rate faster than the speed of sound. All high explosives (including blasting caps, detonating cord, dynamite, shaped charges, boosters, etc.) in accordance to Section 555.203 must be stored in:

Low Explosives

Low explosives detonate producing a large volume of heated gas. All low explosives in accordance to Section 555.203 (such as black powder, display fireworks, safety fuse, igniters, etc.) must be stored in:

  • Type-1, -2, or -4 Permanent, portable or mobile (indoor/outdoor) magazines

Blasting Agents

Blasting agents are a material or mixture that consists of fuel and oxidizer that is intended solely for blasting and that cannot be detonated by a No. 8 test blasting cap when unconfined. Blasting agents may be stored** in:

  • Type-5 Permanent, portable, or mobile (indoor/outdoor) magazines

**Blasting agents stored WITH high explosives must be stored in a Type-1 or -2 magazine

 

Storage Security

Hinges and Hasps

Hinges and hasps must be attached to storage doors by bolting, riveting, or welding so that the door bolts cannot be removed from the outside.

Locks

Having the appropriate locks will help hinder robberies and break-ins. The ATF recommends that any padlock securing an explosives magazine have an ASTM (American Society of Testing Materials) rating of at least 5.

More information can be found in ASTM’s F883-97 “Standard Performance Specifications for Padlocks”.

General requirements:

  • Two mortise locks
  • Two padlocks fastened in separate hasps and staples
  • Padlocks must have at least five tumblers and a casehardened shackle of at least ⅜-inch diameter
  • Padlocks must be protected with no less than ¼-inch steel hoods constructed so as to prevent sawing or lever actions on the locks, hasps, and staples
  • Three-point lock
  • Combination of mortise lock and padlock
  • Mortise lock requiring two keys to open

Indoor Magazines

The locking requirements for indoor magazines are similar to outdoor magazines requirements with a few exceptions. An indoor magazine located in a locked secured room with door hinges and lock hasp securely fastened to the magazine (noted in 27 CFR 555.208(b), 555.210(b) and 555.211(b)), may have each door locked with one steel padlock that meets the stated requirements above.

“Hockey Puck” Locks

“Hockey puck” locks have no visible shackle. The locking bolt and staple are completely covered and protected by the lock body. For the locks to be approved for use, the lock must have a casehardened shackle and a close-fitting shroud to prevent sawing or prying of the lock.

Prior to installation, the licensee/permittee must submit a request for a variance.

Flush Mounted Locks

Flush mounted locks (aka “flush-mount lever locks”) do not provide sufficient protection against pulling or prying the lid off the magazine. A flush mounted lock fails to provide an acceptable level of theft-resistance for indoor storage of low explosive materials and may not be used to secure Type-4 indoor magazines. Additional information can be found at ATF Ruling 2004-3.

Licensee and/or permittee who desires to use this type of lock in a secured room that is locked as noted in subparagraph (b) of 27 CFR 555.210 may submit a request for a variance.

Vehicular Magazines for Storage 

Type-2, -4, and -5 unattended vehicular magazines must have the wheels removed or otherwise immobilized by kingpin locking devices. Other methods must be approved by the Director.

Magazine Inspections

  • Magazines must be inspected at least once every 7 days. Inspection must be sufficient to determine if there has been unauthorized or attempted entry
  • A full inventory of your explosive materials is required annually and entered into your Daily Summary of Magazine Transactions

Bullet Resistance

Federal regulations require that Type-1 and Type-2 explosive magazines be bullet-resistant. “Bullet-resistant” means resistant to penetration by a bullet of 150 grain M2 ball ammunition (nominal muzzle velocity of 2,700 feet per second). Construction requirements for Type-2 outdoor magazines (i.e. exterior and doors constructed of not less than ¼-inch thick steel and lines with at least 2 inches of hardwood) are fixed to guarantee bullet-resistance.

ATF Ruling 76-18 details alternate construction standards for explosive magazines.

Bullet Resistance for Type-2 Indoor Storage

Type-2 indoor magazines do not need to be bullet-resistant if the buildings in which they’re stored in provide protection from bullet penetration. Type-2 indoor magazines have less strict construction regulations due to the additional protection afforded by the associated building (see Part 555.208(b)). Please note that if the magazine, nor the building in which it is located, is bullet resistant, then the magazine and building must meet bullet-resistance requirements.

If there’s a concern that the combined construction doesn’t meet listed requirements and ATF Ruling 76-18 doesn’t address the situation, a licensee or permittee may submit a request for a variance to the requirements contained in 27 CFR 555.208. Variance requestions should be submitted to the Explosives Industry Programs Branch via your local ATF office. When submitting your request for a variance, please include specific construction information for both the magazine and building in which it is located.

1.3G Fireworks Storage Magazines Regulations & Requirements

TYPES OF COMMERCIAL FIREWORKS AND THEIR STORAGE

1-3g-fireworks-storage-magazines
Learning what the proper way to store ATF regulated 1.3G Fireworks is the best way to stay in compliance for safety in storage magazines.

In general, there are three main types of commercial fireworks. These three categories of devices are closely regulated by several government agencies, with special focus on the the Department of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms.

DISPLAY FIREWORKS

Display fireworks are the large and grandiose type of displays usually utilized in professional fireworks displays. These shows are closely supervised by a trained pyrotechnician. This type of firework produces a visible and / or audible effect in the form of combustion, deflagration, or deterioration. This includes all fireworks falling under the following distinctions;

Containing more than 2 grains (130 mg.) of flash powder

  • Aerial shells containing more than 40 g. of pyrotechnic compositions
  • Display pieces which exceed the limits of explosive materials classified as “consumer fireworks
  • Fused set pieces containing components which together exceed 50 mg, of flash powder

These fireworks are all classified under the Department of Transportation under UN0333, UN0334, and UN0335, and must be transported under the guidlines set aside for fireworks.

To be in possession of such fireworks, one must have procured an ATF Federal Explosives License in compliance with 27 CFR, Part 555.

CONSUMER FIREWORKS

Commercial fireworks are the standard type of fireworks one will find readily available in stores and roadside stands. These fireworks are small, and commercially available to the general public. These include;

 

  • Ground devices containing 50 mg. or less of flash powder
  • Aerial devices containing 130 mg. or less of flash powder.

While commercial fireworks are not regulated by the ATF, they are still classified by the Department of Transportation as products UN0336 and UN0337, and any person manufacturing consumer fireworks for commercial use MUST obtain a Federal Explosives Manufacturing License.

ARTICLES PYROTECHNIC

These particular devices are pyrotechnic devices manufactured for professional use. They are similar to commercial fireworks in chemical composition and construction, but are not intended for consumer use. These devices also fall under the regulation of 27 CFR 555.11.
STORAGE MAGAZINE DISTINCTIONS FOR FIREWORKS STORAGE

 

The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) has a five type distinction for the storage of explosives. All of these distinctions of type are governed by the storage rules as laid down in CFR Part 555.206 (Location of magazines), CFR 555.207 (Construction of Type 1 Magazines),CFR 555.208 (Construction of Type 2 Magazines), CFR 555.209 (Construction of Type 3 Magazines), CFR 555.210 (Construction of Type 4 Magazines), CFR 555.211 (Construction of Type 5 Magazines), and CFR 555.213 (Quantity and Storage Restrictions).

The types of explosives regulated under the Code of Federal Regulations Part 555 are defined as such;

Type 1 Magazines: Permanent storage for high explosives. Subject to CFR 555.206 and CFR 555.213 limitations. Other classes of explosives may also be stored.

    1. Type 2 Magazines: Mobile or portable indoor and outdoor storage for high explosives subject to limitations under CFR 555.206, CFR 555.208, and CFR 555.213.
    2. Type 3 Magazines: Portable outdoor magazines for storage of high explosives while attended (ex: a “day box”), subject to limitations for CFR 555.206, and CFR 555.213. Other classes may also be stored.

 

  • Type 4 Magazines: Low explosives. Subject to the limitations presented by CFR 555.206, CFR 555.210, and CFR 555.213. Detonators that will not mass detonate may also be stored.
  • Type 5 Magazines: Blasting agents. These agents are subject to CFR 555.206, CFR 555.211, and CFR 555.213.

 

 

Explosive Storage Magazines for Ammunition and Pyrotechics

TYPE 2, 3, AND 4 STORAGE MAGAZINES for Explosives, Fireworks & Pyrotechnics

explosive-materail-storage-magazine-prices-kl-security
Construction of storage containers and magazines meets or exceeds specifications set forth by the ATF CFR 72 and/or DoD

Storage magazines are used in the storage and transportation of both high and low explosives. This brief summary will focus on Type 2, 3, and 4 storage magazines. All of the magazines covered in this summary are rated to store both high and low explosives.

High explosives are materials that will detonate. These include; blasting caps, detonating cord, dynamite, shaped charges, and boosters. Low explosives are materials that deflagrate, producing large volumes of heated gas. These include; black powder, display fireworks, safety fuse igniters, igniter cord, and fuse lighters.

pricing

Type 2 Storage Magazines

Type 2 storage magazines can be used for both indoor and outdoor storage, and can be both mobile and portable. All Type 2 magazines must meet or exceed ATF specifications CFR 555.11. These qualifications for Type 2 magazine as defined by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms state that in order for a Type 2 magazine to be in compliance it must have;

double wall, welded construction with 3” or airspace throughout

  • exterior walls of 10 gauge, formed, Galvanized steel
  • a roof of 16 gauge steel
  • interior wall of ⅜” steel plate
type-2-storage-magazine-ammunition-explosives
Type 2, 4 and 4 containers, buildings and portable dayboxes to meet your needs and budget price requirements.

Type 2 magazines are manufactured predominantly for the storage of high explosives. These magazines are made for indoor or outdoor placement. As directed by the ATF, these magazines can not hold more than 50 lbs. of explosive materials. Outdoor Type 2 magazines must be built to bullet resistant design. Type 2 magazines are easily portable, and can be housed most places with a flat surface. These magazines are built for turn-key installation, allowing for easy location.

A prime example of a compliant Type 2 storage magazine is the Securall M200 Explosive Storage Magazine.

Type 3 Storage Magazines

Type 3 magazine storage containers are commonly known in layman’s terms as “Day Boxes.” These magazines are utilized mainly in the transportation of high and low explosives to sites in the field, and are to mean to be attended at all times. Per the ATF, “Explosive materials are not to be left unattended in type 3 magazines and must be removed to type 1 or 2 magazines for unattended magazines.

Magazines meeting the criteria for Type 3 classification must be easily portable. Type 3 magazines can be mounted to a vehicle or trailer, or can be left free standing to be carried by hand. A textbook example of the Type 3 storage magazines it the Securall Type 3 Daybox. Features of the Day Box include;

 

  • 12 gauge steel
  • Interior lined with ½” plywood
  • all spark producing material covered or sealed
  • padlock hasps welded, riveted, or bolted with nuts on the inside
  • finish of 2 part chemical resistant aliphatic polyurethane

Type 4 Storage Magazines

Type 2 storage magazines are designed for the storage of low or high explosives. These magazines are made of steel, and are weather, fire, and theft resistant. Like its type 2 counterparts, a type 4 magazine is made for indoor, outdoor, portable, or mobile use. However, a type 4 magazine can also be used in a permanent location.

An example of an exemplary Type 4 storage magazine is the Securall M400 Explosive Storage Magazine. This magazine comes equipped with many features, including;

 

  • 12 gauge formed outer wall
  • interior lined with ½” plywood sheets
  • 2 hooded hasps for padlocks placed on door to prevent tampering or forced entry
  • Lift lugs

Larger units of type 4 storage magazines are manufactured with I Beam supports running the length of the structure, and the magazines can be drug along surfaces by the end of the I Beams. These magazines can also be equipped with fork channels and casters to make relocation even more simple.

It should also be noted that 1.3G display fireworks (formerly Class B fireworks) that are for aerial display are to be stored in approved storage magazines. Whether these are for pyrotechnics storage or ATF 54 licensed persons requiring day boxes, our full line of fireworks storage containers and solutions are designed to meet your price point and budget.