Five Things You Need to Know
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SCIF Container Series | Part 8.1: Intrusion Detection Systems


SCIFs, when not occupied, must be protected by Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS). This includes walls that are not at the SCI level. The AO will ultimately determine what security programs will be needed to protect these areas of a SCIF from unauthorized entry and movement. Doors that don’t have access control systems and/or not under visual surveillance must be monitored by the IDS. In the event of a power failure or other event that makes the IDS inoperable, SCI-indoctrinated personnel must occupy areas of the SCIF until the IDS system resumes normal operation. The SCIF emergency plan will address IDS failures.


All system plans must be approved by the AO. As a part of the SCIF accreditation package, a final system acceptance testing will be conducted.

IDS System Requirements


All IDS installation of monitoring stations and related components must comply with:

  • Underwriters Laboratories (UL) Standard for National Industrial Security Systems for the Protection of Classified Materials, UL 2050
    • Installation must comply with Extent 3 installation noted in UL 2050. This includes systems developed and used by the USG. These systems don’t need UL certification but should comply with Extent 3 installation.

Areas, as mentioned above, that do not need protection at the SCI level will be protected by IDS that includes UL 639 listed motion sensors and UL 634 listed High Security Switches (HSS) that meet UL Level II requirements and/or other AO-approved sensors. New SCIF accreditations must use UL Level II HSS. Until IDS modifications and upgrades are made, existing UL Level I HSS are authorized.


All cabling that extends beyond the SCIF perimeter must use Encrypted Line Security or be installed in a closed sealed metal conveyance (pipe, tube, or something constructed of Electrical Metallic Tubing (EMT), pipe conduit or rigid sheet metal ducting). All joints and connections on the closed metal conveyance must be permanently sealed around all surfaced by welding, epoxy, fusion, etc. Set screws cannot be used to seal the surface. This seal will provide a continuous bond between all components of the conveyance. If a service or pull box must be used, it must be approved with GSA approved combination padlock or an AO approved key lock.


SCIFs that share a common perimeter or have an established Co-Use Agreement (CUA) and support the same IC Element, may have the PCU (Premise Control Unit) programmed into multiple units or partitions. This allows each SCIF to function as individual control units for the IDS installed in several different areas or rooms that are independent of one another. Compliance conditions apply to the PCU, IDS, and partitions of the PCU equally. However, the PCU must be independent of IDS safeguarding non-UL 2050 certified areas.


For a monitoring station that is in charge of more than one IDS, there must be both audible and visible annunciation for each IDS. Fire, smoke, radon, water, and other systems must be independent of the IDS. If IDS incorporates an access control system (ACS), the ACS notifications must be subordinate in priority to IDS alarms. Without the application of specific countermeasures and the approval of the AO, systems cannot include audio or video monitoring. If monitoring systems contain auto-reset features, those features must be disabled.


All system key items and passwords must be protected and restricted to U.S. SCI-indoctrinated personnel. Alarm activations must be displayed locally until cleared by an authorized SCI-cleared individual. Determined by the AO, all IDS technical drawings, installation instructions, specifications, etc. will be restricted and documented in the CSP.

IDS False Alarms


An IDS false alarm is defined as any alarm signal transmitted in the absence of a confirmed intrusion that is caused by changes in the environment, equipment malfunction, or electrical disturbances. If false alarms exceed this requirement, a technical evaluation of the system must be conducted to determine the cause. Once evaluation is complete and the system is repaired or resolved, it must be documented. False alarms cannot exceed one alarm per 30-day period per IDS partition.

System Components


Sensors

  • All system sensors must be located within the SCIF
    • Exception: The AO can approve external sensors on the SCIF perimeter so long as they are installed in a closed sealed metal conveyance (pipe, tube, or something constructed of Electrical Metallic Tubing (EMT), pipe conduit or rigid sheet metal ducting). All joints and connections on the closed metal conveyance must be permanently sealed around all surfaced by welding, epoxy, fusion, etc. Set screws cannot be used to seal the surface. If a service or pull box must be used, it must be approved with GSA approved combination padlock or an AO approved key lock.
  • SCIF perimeter doors must be protected by an HSS and a motion detection sensor
  • Emergency exit doors will be alarmed and monitored 24 hours per day
  • When primary entrance door has a delay to allow changing the system mode of access, this delay must not exceed 30 seconds
  • Dual technology sensors are authorized when each technology transmits alarm conditions that are independent of the other technology.
  • Areas not protected at the SCI level will have a sufficient number of motion detection sensors or be approved by the AO. Sensors will consist of UL 639 listed motion sensors and UL 634 listed HSS that meet UL Level II requirements and/or other AO-approved equivalent sensors.
    • Note: For facilities outside the U.S. and in Category I and II countries, motion detection sensors above false ceilings or below false floors may be required by the AO.
  • Failed sensors will cause immediate and continuous alarm activation until this failure is investigated and corrected following procedures documented in the SCIF SOP/Emergency Action Plan.

Premise Control Units (PCUs)


Premise control Units (PCUs) must be located within a SCIF and access modes can only be started by SCIF personnel only. The access/secure switch will be restricted by a device or procedure that confirms authorized use. Within the SCIF, the cabling between sensors and the PCU must be dedicated to the system and comply with both national and local electrical codes and Committee for National Security Systems (CNSS) standards. However if the wiring can’t be contained within the SCIF, the wiring must meet the requirements in the External Transmissions Line Security section below.


At the PCU and/or monitoring station, alarm status must be continuously displayed with an alphanumeric display. Every effort must be made to install the alarm-monitoring panel in a location that prevents observation by unauthorized personnel. The PCU/monitoring station must identify and display all activated sensors. A change in power status (AC or backup) will also be indicated locally and at the monitoring station/PCU. All auto-alarm reset features of the IDS must be disabled.


Alarm notifications must be immediate and continuous for the following situations:

  • Intrusion Detection
  • Failed Sensor
  • Tamper Detection
  • Maintenance Mode
  • IDS Sensor Points masked or shunted during maintenance mode

In the events noted above, only SCI-indoctrinated personnel can reset the PCU and only after inspection and determination for the cause of the alarm. IDS transmission lines going from the SCIF to the monitoring station must meet the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) for certified encrypted lines. The FIPS standards employed must be noted in the UL 2050/CRZH Certificate or other certificate. PCUs that are certified under UL 1610 have to meet FIPS 197 or FIPS 140-2 encryption certification and method.


For PCUs certified under UL1076, only FIPS 140-2 will be the accepted encryption certification and method. The AO can approve alternative methods but must be noted in the IDS Certificate. IDS Admin that are SCI cleared must maintain and change all default profiles, PINs, or passcodes to a unique PIN/passcode.


More IDS specifications will be explored in the next installment: Part 8.2.


Does your facility require a SCIF? KL Security offers SCIF Container Solutions with panelized modular systems for scalable modular, portable, & mobile requirements.  We assist in the acquisition of modular facilities for DoD & Government Access Control and ICD705 SCIFs or SAPF facilities. We also assist with special access control planning and commercial business security.


Call 866-867-0306 or email contact@klsecurity.com to see how the experts at KL Security can assist your facility in security needs.

Technical Specifications for Construction and Management of Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities
SCIF Container Series | Part 1: Site Evaluation
SCIF Container Series | Part 2: Design Planning Checklist
SCIF Container Series | Part 3: Perimeter Wall Construction – Wall A
SCIF Container Series | Part 4: Perimeter Wall Specifications – Wall B
SCIF Container Series | Part 5: Perimeter Wall Specifications – Wall C
SCIF Container Series | Part 6: Vents and Ducts
SCIF Container Series | Part 7: Modular SCIFs

Information has been gathered from sources deemed reliable but not guaranteed and is subject to change without notice. The information contained in this site is provided for informational purposes only.


SCIF Container Series | Part 7: Modular SCIFs


Modular SCIFs include ground-based temporary SCIFs (T-SCIFs) and include those on mobile platforms such as trucks and trailers/containers, and SCIFs aboard aircrafts and on surface/subsurface vessels. Modular SCIFs are the most durable and cost effective SCIF in both design and manufacturing. These versatile SCIFs require less construction time than a regular SCIF and can be permanent or relocatable depending on your needs.


Modular SCIFs are constructed off-site and arrive at their destination wired and ready for use. Container SCIFs can be entirely customizable from height to interior details to meet your specialized needs. There’s no limit on size! The interior customization can include pre-wired workstations, conference areas, and secure server rooms.


T-SCIFs, depending on its design, can also be adjusted for future expansion to increase the longevity of your SCIF. For construction, modular SCIFs must adhere to the Fixed Facility checklist outlined in ICD 705. This includes acoustic, visual, and concealed entry protection. Cables and wires, as with all SCIFs, must be protected. Ground-based structures must be secured with GSA-approved locking devices and tamper-evident seals.


Depending on your needs, TEMPEST countermeasures, Intrusion Detection System (IDS), and Access Control System (ACS) are optional features that can be included in T-SCIFs. It is ultimately up to the CTTA to decide if TEMPEST countermeasures are needed with your T-SCIF. The AO and CTTA will collaborate to provide red/black separation and protected distribution guidance for field installation in accordance with NSTISSAM TEMPEST 2/95 and 2/95A, and CNSSI 7003.

Storage and Site Security


Like other SCIFs, T-SCIFs have specific requirements for overall security and storage of materials. Aircrafts and surface/subsurface vessels require more security measures than ground-based T-SCIFs. Secure materials used inside a container SCIF must be limited to what is needed for operation. These materials must be stored in GSA-approved containers. The AO may approve exceptions to the storage of secure material in GSA-approved containers for a period of time.


When this secure material is no longer needed, it must be destroyed by a means approved by the AO. Once a T-SCIF is no longer in use, a SCI security official will inspect the facility to ensure all secure material has been removed.


It’s the AO’s responsibility to evaluate and assess operational risks associated with the location of the T-SCIF, specifically if it’s located in an area that is not U.S.-controlled. The AO will determine what area offers the greatest degree of protection against forced entry.


The T-SCIF will have only one entrance that will be controlled and monitored during the T-SCIF’s hours of operation by SCI-indoctrinated persons via access roster. When in operation, the perimeter will be guarded by guards with a U.S. SECRET clearance. Hardened T-SCIFs with no open storage of secure material can be monitored by a U.S. SECRET-cleared individual.


Does your facility require a SCIF? KL Security offers SCIF Container Solutions with panelized modular systems for scalable modular, portable, & mobile requirements.  We assist in the acquisition of modular facilities for DoD & Government Access Control and ICD705 SCIFs or SAPF facilities. We also assist with special access control planning and commercial business security.

Call 866-867-0306 or email contact@klsecurity.com to see how the experts at KL Security can assist your facility in security needs.

Technical Specifications for Construction and Management of Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities
SCIF Container Series | Part 1: Site Evaluation
SCIF Container Series | Part 2: Design Planning Checklist
SCIF Container Series | Part 3: Perimeter Wall Construction – Wall A
SCIF Container Series | Part 4: Perimeter Wall Specifications – Wall B
SCIF Container Series | Part 5: Perimeter Wall Specifications – Wall C
SCIF Container Series | Part 6: Vents and Ducts


Information has been gathered from sources deemed reliable but not guaranteed and is subject to change without notice. The information contained in this site is provided for informational purposes only.

SCIF Container Series | Part 6: Vents and Ducts

Vents and ducts construction for a fixed facility SCIF have a short list of specifications that must be adhered to during construction.

All vents and ducts have to be protected to meet the acoustic and security requirements of the SCIF. The walls that surround the duct penetrations have to be finished to eliminate any opening between the duct(s) and the wall(s).


If vent or duct openings penetrate the SCIF perimeter walls and exceed 96 square inches, the vents/ducts must be protected with permanently attached bars or grills. Listed below are the detailed requirements for bars and grills.


  • Bars or grills are not required if one dimension of penetration measures less than six inches
  • If metal sound baffles or wave forms are permanently installed and set no farther apart than six inches in one dimension, then bars or grills are not required

If bars are used:


  • Bars must be a minimum of ½ inch diameter steel, welded vertically and horizontally six inches o.c.
    • Deviation of ½ inch in vertical and/or horizontal spacing is permissible

If grills are used, they must be made of:


  • ¾ inch-mesh, #9 (10 gauge), case-hardened, expanded metal; OR
  • Expanded metal diamond mesh, 1 ½ inch #10 (1 ⅜ inch by 3 inch openings, 0.093 inch thickness, with at least 80% open design) tamperproof; OR
  • Welded wire fabric (WWF) 4×4 W2.9xW2.9 (6 gauge smooth steel wire welded vertically and horizontally 4 inches o.c.)

If bars, grills, or metal baffles/waveforms are required for your SCIF, an access port will have to be installed inside the secure SCIF perimeter. This access port will allow visual inspection of all the bars, grills, or metal baffles/waveforms for signs of security risks.


If the area outside the SCIF is controlled (SECRET or equivalent space), the access port can be installed outside the perimeter. However, the port must be secured with an AO-approved high-security lock and must be noted in the FFC. 


Does your facility require a SCIF? KL Security offers SCIF Container Solutions with panelized modular systems for scalable modular, portable, & mobile requirements.  We assist in the acquisition of modular facilities for DoD & Government Access Control and ICD705 SCIFs or SAPF facilities. We also assist with special access control planning and commercial business security.


Call 866-867-0306 or email contact@klsecurity.com to see how the experts at KL Security can assist your facility in security needs.

Technical Specifications for Construction and Management of Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities
SCIF Container Series | Part 1: Site Evaluation
SCIF Container Series | Part 2: Design Planning Checklist
SCIF Container Series | Part 3: Perimeter Wall Construction – Wall A
SCIF Container Series | Part 4: Perimeter Wall Specifications – Wall B
SCIF Container Series | Part 5: Perimeter Wall Specifications – Wall C

Information has been gathered from sources deemed reliable but not guaranteed and is subject to change without notice. The information contained in this site is provided for informational purposes only.

SCIF Container Series | Part 5: Perimeter Wall Specifications – Wall C

Wall C is suggested to be used for Plywood. The list below and accompanying diagram list all construction specifications for Wall C.
  • Three layers of Gypsum Wall Board (GWB) ⅝ inch-thick
    • Two layers on the uncontrolled side
      • Sound group 4
    • One layer over min. ½” plywood on the controlled side
      • CTTA recommended countermeasures: (foil backed GWB or a layer of approved Ultra Radiant R-Foil) must be put up for RF shielding. In accordance with IAW, the foil will be located between the layer of plywood and GWB
  • ½” Plywood attached 8’ vertical by 4’ horizontal to 16 gauge studs using glue and #10 steel tapping screws at 12 o.c.
  • Gypsum Wall Board must be mounted to the Plywood with screws and avoiding contact with studs to ease any acoustic flanking path
  • 16 gauge continuous track (top and bottom) with anchors at 32” on center max.)
    • Bed will be in a continuous bead of acoustical sealant
  • Fire safe non-shrink grout, or acoustic sealant in all voids above/below track on both sides of the wall
  • Entire wall shall be finished and painted from true floor to ceiling


Does your facility require a SCIF? KL Security offers SCIF Container Solutions with panelized modular systems for scalable modular, portable, & mobile requirements.  We assist in the acquisition of modular facilities for DoD & Government Access Control and ICD705 SCIFs or SAPF facilities. We also assist with special access control planning and commercial business security.


Call 866-867-0306 or email contact@klsecurity.com to see how the experts at KL Security can assist your facility in security needs.


Technical Specifications for Construction and Management of Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities
SCIF Container Series | Part 1: Site Evaluation
SCIF Container Series | Part 2: Design Planning Checklist
SCIF Container Series | Part 3: Perimeter Wall Construction – Wall A
SCIF Container Series | Part 4: Perimeter Wall Specifications – Wall B

Information has been gathered from sources deemed reliable but not guaranteed and is subject to change without notice. The information contained in this site is provided for informational purposes only.

SCIF Container Series | Part 4: Perimeter Wall Specifications – Wall B

Wall B is suggested to be used for a Fixed Facility SCIF that is Open Storage without SID. The list below and accompanying diagram list all construction specifications for Wall B.
  • Three layers of Gypsum Wall Board (GWB) ⅝ inch-thick
    • One layer on the uncontrolled side
    • Two layers on the controlled side
    • Acoustic protection: Sound Class 3
  • Wallboard must be attached to 3 ⅝ inch-wide 16 gauge metals studs or wooden 2×4 studs placed no less than 16” on center
  • 16 gauge continuous track (top and bottom) with anchors at 32” on center maximum in continuous bead of acoustical sealant
For Expanded Metal:
  • Three-quarter inch mesh, #9 (10 gauge) expanded metal must be affixed to the interview side of all SCIF perimeter wall studs
  • Expanded metal must be spot-welded to the studs every six inches along each vertical stud at the ceiling and floor
  • Hardened screws with one inch washers or hardened clips should be used in lieu of welding to fasten metal to the studs
    • Screws must be applied every six inches along each vertical stud at the ceiling and floor
  • Fastening method must be noted in the FFC
  • Entire wall must be finished and painted from floor to ceiling

 

Does your facility require a SCIF? KL Security offers SCIF Container Solutions with panelized modular systems for scalable modular, portable, & mobile requirements.  We assist in the acquisition of modular facilities for DoD & Government Access Control and ICD705 SCIFs or SAPF facilities. We also assist with special access control planning and commercial business security.


Call 866-867-0306 or email contact@klsecurity.com to see how the experts at KL Security can assist your facility in security needs.


Technical Specifications for Construction and Management of Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities
SCIF Container Series | Part 1: Site Evaluation
SCIF Container Series | Part 2: Design Planning Checklist
SCIF Container Series | Part 3: Perimeter Wall Construction – Wall A

Information has been gathered from sources deemed reliable but not guaranteed and is subject to change without notice. The information contained in this site is provided for informational purposes only.

SCIF Container Series | Part 3: Perimeter Wall Construction – Wall A

Wall A is suggested to be used for these Fixed Facility SCIFs: Closed Storage, Secure Working Area (SWA), Continuous Operation, or Open Storage with SID. The list below and accompanying diagram list all construction specifications for Wall A.
  • Three layers of Gypsum Wall Board (GWB) ⅝ inch-thick
    • One layer on the uncontrolled side
    • Two layers on the controlled side
    • Acoustic protection: Sound Class 3
  • Wallboard must be attached to 3 ⅝ inch-wide 16 gauge metals studs or wooden 2×4 studs placed no less than 16” on center
  • 16 gauge continuous track (top and bottom) with anchors at 32” on center maximum in continuous bead of acoustical sealant
  • Interior two layers of wallboard must be mounted so seams do not align
  • Acoustic fill 3 ½” (89 mm) sound attenuation material, fastened to prevent sliding down and leaving void at the top
  • Top and bottom of each wall must be sealed with acoustic sealant where it meets the slab
  • Fire safe non-shrink grout or acoustic sealant in all voids above/below track both sides of partition
  • Entire wall must be finished and painted from floor to ceiling
  • Any electrical or communications outlets required on the perimeter wall must be surface mounted


Does your facility require a SCIF? KL Security offers SCIF Container Solutions with panelized modular systems for scalable modular, portable, & mobile requirements.  We assist in the acquisition of modular facilities for DoD & Government Access Control and ICD705 SCIFs or SAPF facilities. We also assist with special access control planning and commercial business security.


Call 866-867-0306 or email contact@klsecurity.com to see how the experts at KL Security can assist your facility in security needs.

Technical Specifications for Construction and Management of Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities
SCIF Container Series | Part 1: Site Evaluation
SCIF Container Series | Part 2: Design Planning Checklist

Information has been gathered from sources deemed reliable but not guaranteed and is subject to change without notice. The information contained in this site is provided for informational purposes only.


SCIF Container Series | Part 2: Design Planning Checklist

Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility

SCIF Secure Repository

Modular and Portable construction for high security electronic information that is processed, discussed, and/or stored. Government work and government-related contract work require a SCIF. 

All SCIFs require specialized construction and security measures (including electronic and TEMPEST security). Every SCIF is designed and constructed according to the purpose of the facility and location. Thus, no two SCIFs are the same in construction and security measures. SCIF planning and design begins with a sponsorship by an Accrediting Official (AO) to ensure security oversight and quality control throughout development.

Design & Build Supplier, Distributor & Manufacturer

ICD 705, ICS 705-1, and ICS 705-2 Compliant Requirements

Individual physical and technical SCIF requirements are assessed by an AO and a construction Site Security Manager (SSM). Both the AO and SSM will take the customer’s needs, purpose of the facility, location, and environmental factors into consideration when designing and in the management of the construction of a SCIF. 

Consult, Plans and Planning of Features of Buildings, Containers and Security

Specialists in Access Control for Accredited SCIFs

For the Operation checklist of Management of a SCIF, refer to this guide for security and data protection.

Note: The features listed below will vary depending on the risk assessments done by your AO and SSM.

  • Perimeter
    • Radio Frequency (RF) protection by a Certified TEMPEST Technical Authority (CTTA)
    • Depending on design, walls may include TEMPEST countermeasures
    • Acoustic and physical protection from outside security threats
  • Access Control Systems (ACS)
  • Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS)
  • Compartmented areas (CA) that provide separation between control systems, compartments, and workstations. Some features of a CA include:
    • Closed Storage – for storage when information is not in use
    • Open Storage – access controlled storage
    • SWA (Secure Working Areas) – used in discussing, handling, and/or processing secure information
    • TSWA (Temporary Secure Working Areas) – for temporary use of discussing, handling, and/or processing secure information
  • Interior vaults and security doors for access control
  • Emergency exists and notification systems

Note: SCIFs outside the United States including Temporary, Airborne, and Shipboard SCIFs , vessel and maritime have more detailed requirements in addition to the features listed above. Those requirements can be found in Technical Specifications for Construction and Management of Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities.


Does your facility require a SCIF? KL Security offers SCIF Container Solutions with panelized modular systems for scalable modular, portable, & mobile requirements.  We assist in the acquisition of modular facilities for DoD & Government Access Control and ICD705 SCIFs or SAPF facilities. We also assist with special access control planning and commercial business security.

Call 866-867-0306 or email contact@klsecurity.com to see how the experts at KL Security can assist your facility in security needs.

Technical Specifications for Construction and Management of Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities
SCIF Container Series | Part 1: Site Evaluation

Information has been gathered from sources deemed reliable but not guaranteed and is subject to change without notice. The information contained in this site is provided for informational purposes only.

SCIF Container Series | Part 1: Site Evaluation


What is a ‘SCIF’? SCIF stands for: Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility. SCIFs are used as locations for sensitive and/or confidential information to be discussed or shared. Many government and private entities utilize SCIFs to safeguard information. The ‘situation room’ in the White House is inarguably the most famous SCIF in the world. The steps we will share with you in this series will highlight the steps taken in acquiring a SCIF.


The first step in acquiring a SCIF, as it is with any security protocol, is recognizing & identifying the need. Every SCIF is constructed independent of another and individual facility needs & risks are addressed and evaluated prior to construction.


Risk Management Process:

The Accrediting Official (AO) and Site Security Manager (SSM) evaluate threats, vulnerabilities, and assets to determine countermeasures needed.

  1. Threat Analysis
    • The capability, intent, and opportunity of an adversary to exploit or damage assets and/or information is assessed.
  2. Vulnerability Analysis
    • The susceptibility of attack to a procedure, facility, information system, equipment or policy is assessed.
  3. Probability Analysis
    • The probability of an adverse action, incident, or attack is assessed.
  4. Consequence Analysis
    • The consequences of an adverse event are assessed: loss of resources, monetary cost, mission impact, and/or program functionality.
  5. Security in Depth (SID)
    • SID includes factors that increase and enhance the probability of detecting threats to SCIFs before the occurrence of an incident. These are additional protection methods taken to further safeguard confidential information/materials.
    • SID is mandatory for locations (containing SCIFs) located outside of the United States due to increased threats.
    • Examples of SID factors:
      • Dedicated response force of U.S. personnel
        • Ex: military bases, embassies, government compounds, contractor compounds with military guard
      • Controlled buildings
        • Containing: separate building access controls, alarms, elevator controls, stairwell controls, etc. required to gain entry into building or thoroughfares leading to SCIF
      • Controlled office areas
        • Must maintain alarm equipment if adjacent to SCIF
      • Fenced compounds
        • Gated entry controlled by security staff and/or access codes
      • Additional mitigations may be developed if deemed necessary to prevent unauthorized entry


Security plans should be coordinated with the AO before construction plans are designed, materials ordered, or contracts signed. Any non-standard methods used to meet security protection levels must be documented & approved by the AO and must at least equal or exceed the level of standard.

Does your facility require a SCIF? KL Security offers SCIF Container Solutions with panelized modular systems for scalable modular, portable, & mobile requirements.  We assist in the acquisition of modular facilities for DoD & Government Access Control and ICD705 SCIFs or SAPF facilities. We also assist with special access control planning and commercial business security.


Call 866-867-0306 or email contact@klsecurity.com to see how the experts at KL Security can assist your facility in security needs.


Technical Specifications for Construction and Management of Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities


Information has been gathered from sources deemed reliable but not guaranteed and is subject to change without notice. The information contained in this site is provided for informational purposes only.

Depository Drop Safes – Maintaining Business Functions in the time of COVID

By Shelley Swearingen | August 20, 2020


This year’s occurrence of a global pandemic has altered the way we live our daily lives as well as the functional procedures of businesses. Business operators are looking for ways to maintain operations while protecting employees & customers. Depository safes make it possible for items to be received with little to no contact between parties. While societally we’re conducting more transactions through digital means, there’s always going to be a need to receive physical payments and documents.


Drop and depository safes were created with the intention of securely receiving and storing payments during non-business hours. Their usage is not limited to after-hours payments, though.


These depository safes can be used for clients to drop off any documentation while eliminating person to person contact. The use of a depository safes also ensures these documents remain safe and their contents are protected. With so many businesses limiting their hours or working remotely, there’s a real necessity for secure receipt of items.


Types of Drop and after hours drop safes:


KL Security is trusted by businesses nationwide spanning various industries. We evaluate each client’s needs to identify the best solution. If you have a security concern, chances are we’ve addressed it. For pricing on secure depositories or to discuss any other security related concerns, call (866) 867-0306 or email contact@klsecurity.com.

Air Tube Systems: Security Applications in the Cannabis Industry

By: Shelley Swearingen | August 18, 2020

Pneumatic Air Tubes may not be considered ‘innovative’, but their application within an emerging market is. Pneumatic tubes have been used to transport items for well over a century, and the legal cannabis industry is in its infancy in America. Cannabis entrepreneurs are in uncharted territory as to how best safeguard their employees and protect product – all while minimizing diversion and driving revenue. Air Tubes are an easy way to achieve all of these goals.

Banks have utilized pneumatic tubes for over a hundred years, and tube systems are commonplace in today’s pharmacies, as well. Air tubes allow for the fast and safe transportation of small items like medication or currency.

By using pneumatic air tubes, dispensaries can keep the majority of their inventory safely stored in a secure room. The less stock left on the sales floor, the less the chances for theft or diversion. When inventory on the sales floor is minimized, the opportunity for diversion is also reduced. A budtender can assist a customer/patient select their preferred product, and then request the quantity from an employee working in a stock room. The item is retrieved (employees never have to leave their respective areas) and sent to the front of the house for the point of sale. This also makes inventory management and surveillance easier.

Air tube systems also provide extra safeguards within cash management. Cashiers are also able to make cash deposits quickly and safely to more secure locations (like vaults).

Out of sight, out of mind. Keeping cash and product stored elsewhere ensures the safety of employees while making it harder for would-be thieves to steal cannabis product – key components to security protocols and operational procedures to deter diversion of cash and cannabis.

KL Security utilizes the THC360 holistic approach when evaluating a facility’s needs. Brand image and company expectations are assessed to formulate the best solution for an issue. Our implementations assist in diversion, drive revenue, and maintain compliance. To see how the experts at K.L. Security can assist your cannabis dispensary/pharmacy, craft growing facility, secure transporting service, or testing facility call us at 866-867-0306 or email contact@klsecurity.com.

Information has been gathered from sources deemed reliable but not guaranteed and is subject to change without notice.